Tag Archives: #KM

Adaptive Tensions: Fuel for Innovation

In the twitter-based group that explores knowledge management topics (#KMers), John Bordeaux made some comments that piqued others’ interest. For example, he wrote that organizations pull for repeatability; people pull for creativity; and conflict can lead to novel approaches for both. This statement speaks to the heart of my interests as a reflective practitioner. In […]

Who’s In & Who’s Out?

A comment by John Lebkowsky in twitter about democracy standing in line piqued my interest and led me to his blog post about e-democracy.org’s 125-member United States issues forum, which is described as “a civil, more deliberative discussion of national public policy issues and politics in the United States among people with diverse political perspectives.” […]

Sometimes you just have to write

Yesterday, I read an article in the Economist that inspired this poem: Twepistemologies with apologies (and credit) to John Godfrey Saxe There were six tweeps in Cyberspace exploring a mistake. “How could exec’s have gone so wrong when so much was at stake?” So in <140 characters Each shared a different take. The First (who […]

Tensions Between Differentiation and Boundary Blurring

The World Cafe is a lot like the “Blind Men and the Elephant” in that it can be viewed in so many ways (as part of knowledge management, dialogue, deliberation, public engagement, social justice work, organizational development, and so on). Juanita Brown, who developed The World Cafe concept in theory and practice, is like many […]

KM Certification

Art Schlussel posted his views on knowledge management (KM) certification in a LinkedIn conversation here: This was my reply: It’s interesting how some KM questions–including certification–keep cycling around year after year. Statements such as “rigorous standards to be considered true ‘certification’ programs” frequently come up. We might make some progress by digging into these statements […]

Food for thought: how do we think about ambiguity?

Chris Jones recently posted On Semantics: Ambiguity is the Enemy and Steve Barth responded with insights about the benefits of ambiguity. If I worked as a bench scientist, production line supervisor, warehouse manager or project manager wearing blinders, I would probably be fully supportive of Chris’ perspectives and puzzled by Steve’s. However, in most of my […]